Blog / Bird House Mounting

Bluebird House Mounting and Care

Bluebird House Mounting and Care

Due to the variety of mounting applications or locations, we do not include any mounting hardware for bluebird houses.

Selecting a Location

In any mounting method, bird houses should be mounted approximately 5 feet off the ground. Houses should be mounted securely facing away from prevailing winds in the area to prevent rain from entering the box. Whenever possible, place the house in a clearing with tall grasses or shrubbery 8-12 feet away.

Don’t be discouraged if birds don’t begin nesting in the house
immediately. Sometimes it takes time for the birds to discover them. For optimum occupancy, place your nest boxes by February in southern areas and mid to late March in northern regions.

Pole Mounting

Bluebird houses can be mounted on a metal pipe/pole using pipe clamps (our preferred method). These materials can typically be found in the plumbing section of the local hardware, plumbing, or fencing store. The pipe clamps should be attached above and below the nesting chamber of the house as shown.

 

Post Mounting Options

The bluebird house can be mounted directly to a 4x4 post or wooden fence post by screwing through the back board above and below the nest chamber of the bluebird house. We recommend using weather resistant screws at least 1/2" longer than the depth of the back board on the house. Pilot holes can be drilled but typically are not necessary with cedar.

To mount the house onto the top of a 4x4 post, screw down through the bottom of the house into the top of the post.  Be aware that these mounting methods do allow predators easy access to disturb the nest box.

Tree Mounting

We do not advise mounting your bluebird house directly to the trunk of a tree as it allows predators, such as raccoons, easy access to the house. 

Maintaining a Clean Bird House

Birdhouses and nesting boxes should be cleaned at least once each year. All Nature's Way birdhouses feature clean-out doors, making it easy to remove the old nest and any debris that have collected. At minimum, cleaning should be done prior to nesting season in the spring. Some recommend cleaning the nesting boxes after each brood has fledged. This type of maintenance will reduce bird parasite problems and help keep the nest box useful longer.

For more detailed cleaning tips visit our blog post: Spring Cleaning is for the Birds!

Read more →

Wren House Mounting and Care

Wren House Mounting and Care

Hanging Your Wren House

Wrens and chickadees both prefer houses that are located in a sheltered area - under the shade and protection of tree branches is ideal. When possible, hang the house so that the entry hole faces away from incoming weather anywhere from 5-10 feet off the ground. Higher or lower placement can also work as long as there is good cover nearby. You can utilize the hanging cable that comes attached to your house to hang it as wrens will use a house that freely swings.

A hanging style house is preferred so that it can be placed outward on a branch to help prevent predators reaching the nest. A box house should be mounted on a pole with space in front of the opening, or can also be mounted under an eave to offer additional protection from the elements and predators. 

For best success, we recommend placing your nest boxes by February in the south. In northern regions, place your nest boxes by mid to late March for best results. Don’t be discouraged if birds don’t begin nesting in them immediately. Sometimes it takes time for the birds to discover and start using a house. 

House Inhabitants

All Nature's Way wren houses have a 1 1/8" opening to accommodate both house wrens and chickadees while keeping unwanted larger birds out.

A male wren will build a nest out of sticks and perch on the branches above the house to attract a female. These small birds have a very beautiful and distinct song and you will often hear their song before you are able to spot them flitting in the branches near the house.

 

A pair of chickadees will work together to build their nest with moss, pet hair, or other types of fur-like material. These small birds are very social and are easily and quickly drawn to bird feeders, oftentimes even when people are nearby.

Maintaining a Clean Bird House

Birdhouses and nesting boxes should be cleaned at least once each year. All Nature's Way birdhouses feature clean-out doors, making it easy to remove the old nest and any debris that have collected. At minimum, cleaning should be done prior to nesting season in the spring. Some recommend cleaning the nesting boxes after each brood has fledged. This type of maintenance will reduce bird parasite problems and help keep the nest box useful longer.

For more detailed cleaning tips visit our blog post: Spring Cleaning is for the Birds!

 

Read more →